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PGA Award Winners 1990-2010

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 19, 2012



Katherine Bigelow At the 2010 PGA Awards

The 2011 Producers Guild

Awards ceremony will be

held at the Beverly Hilton

on Saturday, January 22nd

featuring a spectacular show

produced by Paula Wagner.

Here is a handy chart

showcasing the PGA Award

winners from 1990 through

2010, celebrating twenty

years of excellence in

entertainment.






1990
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Driving Miss Daisy: Richard D. Zanuck, Lili Fini Zanuck
1991
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Dances With Wolves: Jim Wilson, Kevin Costner
Television
The Civil War: Ken Burns, Ric Burns
1992
Theatrical Motion Pictures
The Silence of the Lambs: Edward Saxon, Kenneth Utt, Ronald M. Bozman
Television
Brooklyn Bridge: Gary David Goldberg
Northern Exposure: Joshua Brand, John Falsey
1993
Theatrical Motion Pictures
The Crying Game: Stephen Woolley
Television
I'll Fly Away: David Chase, Ian Sander
1994
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Schindler's List: Steven Spielberg, Branko Lustig, Gerald R. Molen
Television
NYPD Blue: Steven Bochco, David Milch, Gregory Hoblit
1995
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Forrest Gump: Wendy Finerman, Steve Tisch, Steve Starkey, Charles Newirth
Long-Form Television
World War II: When Lions Roared: David W. Rintels, Ethel Winant, Victoria Riskin
Television Series
ER: John Wells, Michael Crichton
1996
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Apollo 13: Brian Grazer, Todd Hallowell
Long-Form Television
Truman: Paula Weinstein, Anthea Sylbert, Doro Bachrach
Television Series
Frasier: David Angell, Peter Casey, David Lee, Christopher Lloyd, Vic Rauseo, Linda Morris, Steven Levitan
1997
Theatrical Motion Pictures
The English Patient: Saul Zaentz
Long-Form Television
Prime Suspect: The Lost Child: Sally Head, Rebecca Eaton, Paul Marcus, Brian Park
Television Series
Law & Order: Dick Wolf, Edwin Sherin, Michael S. Chernuchin, Rene Balcer, Ed Zuckerman, Arthur W. Forney, Gardner Stern, Jeffrey M. Hayes, Lewis Gould, Billy Fox, Jeremy R.
1998
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Titanic: James Cameron, Jon Landau
Long-Form Television
Miss Evers Boys: Robert Benedetti, Laurence Fishburne, Derek Kavanagh, Kip Konwiser, Kern Konwiser, Peter Stelzer
Television Series
Biography: Michael Cascio, CarolAnne Dolan, Diane Ferenczi
1999
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Saving Private Ryan: Steven Spielberg, Allison Lyon Segan, Bonnie Curtis, Ian Bryce, Mark Gordon, Gary Levinsohn
Long-Form Television
From the Earth to the Moon: Tom Hanks, Tony To, John P. Melfi, Graham Yost, Brian Grazer, Ron Howard, Michael Bostick, Erik Bork, Bruce Richmond, Janace Tashjian
Television Series
The Practice: David E. Kelley, Robert Breech, Jeffrey Kramer, Christina Musrey, Gary M. Strangis, Pamela J. Wisne
2000
Theatrical Motion Pictures
American Beauty: Bruce Cohen, Dan Jinks
Long-Form Television
Tuesdays With Morrie: Oprah Winfrey, Kate Forte
Television Series
The Sopranos: David Chase, Brad Grey
2001
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Gladiator: Douglas Wick, Branko Lustig
Long-Form Television
Death of a Salesman: Brian Dennehy, Patricia Clifford, Marc Bauman
Television Series - Comedy
Sex and the City: Darren Star, Michael Patrick King, John P. Melfi, Jenny Bicks
Television Series - Drama
The West Wing: John Wells, Aaron Sorkin, Thomas Schlamme, Llewellyn Wells, Michael Hissrich
2002
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Moulin Rouge!: Baz Lurhmann, Fred Baron, Martin Brown
Long-Form Television
Band of Brothers: Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, Tony To
Television Series - Comedy
Sex and the City: Michael Patrick King, Cindy Chupack, John P. Melfi, Sarah Jessica Parker
Television Series - Drama
The West Wing: John Wells, Aaron Sorkin, Thomas Schlamme, Llewellyn Wells, Chris Misiano, Alex Graves, Michael Hissrich
2003
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Chicago: Martin Richards
Long-Form Television
Live from Baghdad: Rosalie Swedlin, Sara Colleton, George W. Perkins
Television Series - Comedy
Curb Your Enthusiasm: Larry David, Jeff Garlin, Robert B. Weide, Tim Gibbons
Television Series - Drama
24: Brian Grazer, Tony Krantz, Howard Gordon, Robert Cochran, Joel Surnow, Cyrus I. Yavneh
Television Series - Reality/Game/Informational
Biography: Various independent producers
2004
Theatrical Motion Pictures
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King: Barrie M. Osborne, Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh
Long-Form Television
My House in Umbria: Frank Doelger, Robert Allan Ackerman, Ann Wingate
Television Series - Comedy
Sex and the City: Michael Patrick King, Cindy Chupack, John P. Melfi, Sarah Jessica Parker, Jenny Bicks, Jane Raab
Television Series - Drama
Six Feet Under: Alan Ball, Alan Poul, Bob Greenblatt, David Janollari
Television Series- Reality/Game/Informational
Queer Eye for the Straight Guy: David Collins, Michael Williams, David Metzler, Lynn Sadofsky
2005
Theatrical Motion Pictures
The Aviator: Michael Mann, Graham King
Long-Form Television
Angels in America: Mike Nichols, Cary Brokaw, Celia D. Costas, Michael Haley
Television Series - Comedy
Curb Your Enthusiasm: Larry David, Jeff Garlin, Robert B. Weide, Tim Gibbons
Television Series - Drama
The Sopranos: David Chase, Brad Grey, Mitchell Burgess, Robin Green, Ilene S. Landress, Terence Winter, Henry Bronchtein, Matthew Weiner, Martin Bruestle
Non-Fiction Television Series
The Amazing Race: Jerry Bruckheimer, Bertram van Munster, Jonathan Littman, Amy Chacon, Hayma Washington, Evan Weinstein, Elise Doganieri, Scott Owens
Variety Television
The Ellen DeGeneres Show: Ellen DeGeneres, Mary Connelly, Ed Glavin, Andy Lassner, Karen Kilgariff
2006
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Brokeback Mountain: Diana Ossana, James Schamus
Animated Motion Pictures
Wallace & Gromit in the Curse of the Were-Rabbit: Claire Jennings, Nick Park
Long-Form Television
The Life and Death of Peter Sellers: Freddy De Mann, George Faber, Charles Pattinson
Television Series - Comedy
Entourage: Doug Ellin, Stephen Levinson, Julian Farino, Mark J. Greenberg, Wayne Carmona
Television Series - Drama
Lost: J.J. Abrams, Damon Lindelof, Bryan Burk, Jack Bender, Jean Higgins, Carlton Cuse
Non-Fiction Television Series
60 Minutes: Jeff Fager
Variety Television
The Ellen DeGeneres Show: Ellen Degeneres, Mary Connelly, Ed Glavin, Andy Lassner, Karen Kilgariff
2007
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Little Miss Sunshine: Marc Turtletaub, David T. Friendly, Peter Saraf, Albert Berger & Ron Yerxa
Animated Motion Pictures
Cars: Darla K. Anderson
Long-Form Television
Elizabeth I: Suzan Harrison, George Faber, Charles Pattinson, Barney Reisz
Television Series - Comedy
The Office: Greg Daniels, Kent Zbornak
Television Series - Drama
Grey's Anatomy: Shonda Rimes, Betsy Beers, Mark Gordon, James D. Parriott, Peter Horton, Rob Corn
Long-Form Television
60 Minutes: Jeff Fager
Variety Television
Real Time with Bill Maher: Bill Maher, Scott Carter, Sheila Griffiths, Dean E. Johnsen
2008
Theatrical Motion Pictures
No Country for Old Men: Scott Rudin, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Documentary Features
Sicko: Michael Moore, Meghan O'Hara
Animated Motion Pictures
Ratatouille: Brad Lewis
Long-Form Television
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: Tom Thayer, Dick Wolf, Clara George
Television Series - Comedy
30 Rock: Lorne Michaels, Tina Fey, Marci Klein, Robert Carlock, Jeff Richmond, Jerry Kupfer
Television Series - Drama
The Sopranos: David Chase, Brad Grey, Ilene S. Landress, Terence Winter, Matthew Weiner, Henry Bronchtein, Diane Frolov, Andrew Schneider, Martin Bruestle, Gianna Maria Smart
Non-Fiction Television Series
Planet Earth: Alastair Fothergill, Maureen Lemire
Television - Live Entertainment/Competition Series
The Colbert Report: Stephen Colbert, Jon Stewart, Allison Silverman, Rich Dahm, Meredith Bennett
2009
Theatrical Motion Pictures
Slumdog Millionaire: Christian Colson
Documentary Features
Man on Wire: Simon Chinn
Animated Motion Pictures
WALL·E: Jim Morris
Long-Form Television
John Adams: David Coatsworth, Frank Doelger, Gary Goetzman, Tom Hanks, Steve Shareshian
Television Series- Comedy
30 Rock: Lorne Michaels, Tina Fey, Marci Klein, Robert Carlock, Jeff Richmond, Jerry Kupfer, David Miner
Television Series- Drama
Mad Men: Matthew Weiner, Scott Hornbacher
Non-Fiction Television Series
60 Minutes: Jeff Fager
Television - Live Entertainment/Competition Series
The Colbert Report: Stephen Colbert, Jon Stewart, Allison Silverman, Rich Dahm, Meredith Bennett, Tom Purcell
2010
Theatrical Motion Pictures
The Hurt Locker: Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Nicolas Chartier, Greg Shapiro
Documentary Features
The Cove: Fisher Stevens, PaulaDuPré Pesmen
Animated Motion Pictures
UP: Jonas Rivera
Long-Form Television
Grey Gardens: Lucy Barzun Donnelly, Rachael Horovitz, Michael Sucsy, David Coatsworth
Television Series- Comedy
30 Rock: Lorne Michaels, Tina Fey, Marci Klein, David Miner, Robert Carlock, Jeff Richmond,
Don Scardino, Jerry Kupfer
Television Series- Drama
Mad Men: Matthew Weiner, Scott Hornbacher
Non-Fiction Television Series
60 Minutes: Jeff Fager
Television - Live Entertainment/Competition Series
The Colbert Report: Stephen T. Colbert, Jon Stewart, Allistion Silverman, Richard Dahmm,
Meredith Bennett, Tom Purcell

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A Message from the Executive Director

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 19, 2012
WHAT CAN WE DO TO MAKE THE PRODUCED BY CONFERENCE EVEN BETTER?
MAKE IT FREE FOR MEMBERS TO ATTEND.


Producing the Produced By Conference the past two years has been one of the most challenging and gratifying undertakings in my ten years at the Guild. And despite the success of the past two years, mounting Produced By 2011 was by no means a sure thing. This event is an expensive one to produce; the Guild spent roughly $800,000 on each of the last two Conferences—and that was with getting many elements as donations, including the space on our host studio lots and the help from our PGA volunteers.

As anyone who was at either of our previous events can tell you, the Produced By Conference has been an incredible success at its primary goal: creating a "home” for the producing community, and sharing the experience and perspective of the very best producers with a wider audience of professionals. But at the behest of our new Presidents, we took a long look at the Conference, considering whether to produce it again this year. Two things were clear to us: 1) If we were to mount the Conference again, it would have to grow and develop; we didn’t want to put on the same event as last year; and 2) We would have to find a way to reduce our financial risk.

As a result, we met with the CEOs and Executive Directors of numerous other organizations, everyone from NATPE to NAB to Digital Hollywood, to see if we could find a suitable partner. Thanks to Madelyn Hammond, we were introduced to Larry Brownell of AFCI Locations Expo, and discovered that our needs meshed: They were seeking more producers to attend their event; we were seeking underwriting. It was a terrific fit, and we have been working together over the past several months to lay the groundwork for an incredible event. Next June, our producers will have access to over 250 film commissions, representing roughly $2.5 billion in budget incentives—and they’ll all be in one place for you to meet with and shop your projects.

Of course, the other element was determining what our venue would be. We were determined to hold the event again on a studio lot; the traditional studio venue is one of the things that makes our conference special. Once again, we got lucky: PGA member and ABC executive Barry Jossen stepped up to the plate in a big way. Barry all but accosted me while I was MC-ing a father/daughter picnic at our children’s school, insisting that we give the Disney lot a shot at hosting the Conference. After looking at their facilities, we were impressed. Disney has made some striking improvements to their lot, including a brand-new theater and many first-rate amenities. Even more impressive was the commitment of Barry and the Disney and ABC executive teams. They want to showcase their studio for our producers, and as a result, they’ll be allowing us to take over the entire lot – including the theater, studio space, and the Disney Legends Promenade. Not only that, the studio has graciously offered to host our General Membership Meeting and kickoff party on Friday night, which all of you are encouraged to attend.

Thanks to AFCI’s underwriting, the Guild has no financial exposure for the event—our only concern is to create the very best programming we can, a task that’s been eagerly undertaken by Gale Anne Hurd, Rachel Klein, and our President Emeritus, Marshall Herskovitz, who joins the Conference effort as a Co-Chair this year.

Best of all, thanks to AFCI’s support, we can open up the Conference doors to 600 members for free this year. I am very much aware of how difficult times are for producers, and we’re committed to giving you the best possible value for your membership. As a result, 600 members each will receive one free day of the Conference – we’ll have 300 slots available for Saturday, and 300 for Sunday. If you want to attend the entire weekend, you’re welcome to pay the member rate of $295 (still a bargain). But for many of you struggling to find work, we can offer a full day of seminars, panel discussions, workshops, vendors (including hundreds of film commissions) and networking events at no charge, courtesy of the PGA.
The simple fact is: We want you at the Produced By Conference. This is an event produced by producers, for producers, and all about producing. And thanks to the hard work of Gale, Rachel, Marshall, the PGA staff and our producing team led by Barry Kaplan – to say nothing of the support we’ve received from AFCI Locations and Disney/ABC – we can look forward to welcoming 600 of you to the event for free.

Registration starts very early next year. Look for our announcements in 2011, as we unveil the next outstanding roster of speakers and programs. Until then, block out the weekend of June 3-5 – in 2011, you’ve got plans.

Sincerely,

Vance Van Petten

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The Art of the Possible

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 19, 2012
On Thursday, October 14, the PGA East Seminars Committee presented Roland Tec’s The Art of the Possible, sponsored by HSBC Bank. The panelists, producers Dolly Hall, Peter Saraf and Eric Steel, addressed a producers’ conundrum — how many variables must be in place before a project can be green-lit. These seasoned independent producers shared specific examples of crucial elements that were and were not in place when the decision was made to go ahead.


Left to right: Eric Steel*, Roland Tec*, Peter Saraf*, Dolly Hall, Seminars
Committee Co-chair Diane Houslin* (*PGA Member)
Moderator Roland Tec began by sharing his very first experience as a producer, working out of his apartment. "In 1996 I was in pre-production on my first feature film, which I was writing, directing, and producing. I had never done
a feature film and we didn’t have the money for post but once we were shooting, this Australian man appeared who had started a post-production company and had read a little blurb in the newspaper about us. He told us, ‘I want some free publicity for my new start-up post facility, so I’m going to donate all the post to you guys.’ This is what happens. You can’t predict where everything’s going to go or who’s going to be waiting around the next corner. Sometimes you take a chance and it pays off.”

In response to the question, "What is the hardest element to have missing when you begin production?” Dolly did not have to think long for an answer: "All the money,” she responded. "You know, I think that as I’ve gotten older and wiser and meaner, it just gets harder to start the movie without all the money. You have to know yourself really well. How much stress can you take? Can you go to bed at night and know that you don’t have all the money? I don’t recommend doing it on more than one movie at the same time, which unfortunately, I’ve also done. One at a time is really plenty.”

Peter Saraf was emphatic that the script is the most important element to have completed when starting production. "The worst feeling and the worst outcome is when you start shooting before the script is done. You might think it’s good enough, but that’s just you telling yourself it’s really not ready. That it could use more work. There is nothing more important than the script. It’s the foundation on which everything is built. While a great script will come to life on set with great actors and a great director, a script that is ‘good enough’ is not going to get better. It’s just going to
make everyone’s job harder.”

Eric Steel responded to a query on networking from an audience member, "I don’t think there really is a ‘network.’ You have to be almost as creative in thinking of where the money is coming from as you do in terms of where the project comes from. I’m working on a movie now—it’s a documentary that has a lot to do with fl y-fi shing. I tell you, I’m going to a lot of dinners where I’m eating a lot of salmon.”

By Jacob Hentoff
Photo by
Catrin Hedström

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Gale Anne Hurd Brings 'The Walking Dead' To Life

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Producer and PGA Board Member Gale Anne Hurd may be best known for such feature films as Aliens, The Incredible Hulk and the Terminator franchise, but she makes an eagerly-anticipated foray into series television this weekend with The Walking Dead, which premieres on Halloween night on AMC. Gale was kind enough to chat with PGA contributor Jesse Gordon to provide an exclusive inside account of the challenges that come with producing a "human drama set against the zombie apocalypse.”


What drew you to this project? You haven’t done a lot of horror before…

I actually want to disagree with you. The Walking Dead isn’t horror, I don’t think. Drawing from Robert Kirkman’s comic book series—which is also an award-winning series of graphic novels—it’s human drama that happens to be set against a zombie apocalypse. I think when you talk about horror, you generally don’t think of "character-driven” in the same sentence. And that’s what distinguishes this material. And of course, everything that Frank Darabont brings to this project as the writer, executive producer and director of the pilot.

So you’ve got a template here in terms of what the graphic novels lay out. How closely are you following that template? Or are you spinning this off in your own direction?

The source material is very important to us, and that is why Robert Kirkman is so closely involved as an executive producer, as the writer of the fourth episode, and he also has approved all casting and all story lines, and is involved on set and in post-production. Early on, Robert, Frank and I met to discuss whether this was going to be a panel-by-panel representation of the comic book, or were we going to explore things that the comic book has not delved into as deeply. It was Robert Kirkman’s belief from the very beginning that these are two different types of media and it was important to be able to both veer off the path that he trailblazed, and yet always come back. So that meant we had the freedom to invent new characters, to extend the lives of a few characters that die very early on in the comic book, possibly to even kill people off a little earlier, and to also explore new story lines that have never appeared in the comic book at all.


Gale Anne Hurd on the set of The Walking Dead
Every zombie story has a slightly different zombie, or a slightly different way of imagining the zombies. What can we expect from the zombies of The Walking Dead? How did you go about bringing the zombies to life?


[laughs] So to speak. Well, the first decisions one has to make are not only what are they going to look like, but how are they going to move? And we hearkened back to the original George Romero Night of the Living Dead. So our zombies might be able to get up to a fairly good jog, at best, because their muscles and organs aren’t exactly in perfect working order. They are not Usain Bolt. But the most important decision was who we would tap to bring our zombies to life. That decision was a foregone conclusion; Frank has an ongoing relationship with Greg Nicotero from KNB Efx. We brought him on very early on, before we had even received the green light. We wanted to make sure that if we were given the green light that he would be available and that he could commit to being on set for the first six episodes. We did a number of early zombie makeup tests, in conjunction with camera tests. We wanted to make sure that the selection of the camera would be the best fit for the make up. We ultimately chose super 16. So we are shooting on film rather than HD.


Hurd with actor Andrew Lincoln, who plays the character of Rick Grimes
That is a departure, especially for TV, these days. What was it about super 16 that appealed to you in terms of the look you were trying to create?


We wanted a "film look” as opposed to something that looked like tape that was super sharp. It didn’t feel as real. There is also inherent grain in film, which worked. You want this to feel gritty and real as apposed to shiny and surreal. In addition to that, you get a much truer representation of the color palette than you do with HD. We found that when shooting HD outside- most of our first six episodes are exterior daylight, of all things- everything went slightly green. And the makeup went green, and that wasn’t what we were looking for. We wanted much more in the gray tones. But in order to remove the green you had to take the green out of everything. And shooting in Georgia in the summer, everything is green…there’s all this rich foliage and then that all would have looked different when color-corrected and would have looked somewhat gray. So the perfect choice was really super 16.

So, where in Georgia did you shoot?

We shot in and around Atlanta, in a place called Mansfield which is up near Covington. And then in a few other areas, but mostly in Metro Atlanta.

What was that like?

It’s hot! It’s humid! [laughs] I am so grateful to our incredible zombie extras, who wore all that makeup and layers of clothes, and never complained, and brought it, regardless of whether it was the first hour or the twelfth hour. You really felt like you survived the zombie apocalypse at the end of a shooting day.

I can believe that. Does Georgia make it easier for producers through some kind of budget incentive?

Yes, they do; they give a thirty percent tax credit. But also, Atlanta is a very significant character in the first few issues of the comic book. It was nice to be able to film where the story was actually set. Atlanta was incredibly conducive to filming. We were able to shut down at least five or maybe six streets in the downtown core area around the federal court building. That is a pretty big area to have shut down, and dress with the undead as well as tanks and burned-out buses and a number of very large set pieces.

We’re really looking forward to it. You got a nice day to premiere it, with Halloween.

Yes. And I am also very happy because our line producer has recently applied to join the Guild.

Excellent! We look forward to welcoming him into the ranks.

I think it is important you know. Everyone should be part of the team.

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Hiring From Within

Posted By CJ -, Wednesday, December 19, 2012


Hiring someone these days can be like finding a person you’d like to go into battle with … will they have your back? Will they come through when you need them the most? And most importantly, can you depend on them and have fun with this person along the way? In my eight years as a member of the PGA, I have always stood firmly behind the idea of hiring fellow members. As a Board member and Co-chair of the Produced By Conference, I felt it was a principle I had to demonstrate. Recently, when I was hiring my staff for season four of UFC Primetime, I knew I was going to follow my mantra again. Within the volunteer ranks of committee chairs, council representatives and volunteers, I found that I had seen first-hand a ton of people’s work ethics… I had found a producing talent pool like never before.
Rachel Klein (left) and Melissa Friedman


I hired Kimberly Austin, Melissa Friedman and even former PGA intern Ryan Willis. These three had volunteered for me at the Producers Challenge, a part of the Produced By Conference, and had worked like it was a high-paying job! I saw dedication, class, skills and responsibility first-hand … and we had a BLAST! I knew I wanted to bring these PGA members into any show I could staff.

Another example is John Peterman, who approached me at the PGA East Tribeca Party two years ago, and simply said, "When I grow up, I want to be YOU!” We struck up a conversation and through my initial impression and subsequent conversations, I knew I wanted this guy on my show one day. That day soon came, and I took JP on the road with me to New Orleans for Steven Seagal: Lawman. A brilliant slice of networking had put John on my radar, and I never forgot him. Each time I crossed his path, interacting with him became a positive experience, so when the coordinator left the show, I went to bat to bring on Peterman.

My essential advice for members looking for work is to volunteer and network. But don’t do either like you’re looking for a job or interviewing, but as if you’d simply like me to get to know you. I want people on my producing team that are energetic, excited about what they can do and looking to be a team player. So get out there, dedicate a few hours to the Guild, with people you know can provide work, and commit yourself to the task at hand… You will shine and be in the mind of people the next time they HIRE FROM WITHIN!

- Rachel Klein

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